Test Your Optimization IQ: Cart Appearance

Test Your Optimization IQ

We surveyed shoppers to understand how they prefer the shopping cart or bag to appear after they add items:

  • Test A: cart notification
  • Test B: cart counter

Can you guess which version shoppers chose?

Select a test to reveal the winner:

Test A: cart notificationTest B: cart counter

Topics: Design Solutions

Test Your Optimization IQ: Product Color Selection

Test Your Optimization IQ

We surveyed shoppers to understand how they preferred to choose a product color:

  • Test A: color section modal (i.e., customization options take up the lower part of the screen)
  • Test B: color selection overlay (i.e., customization options take over the entire screen)

Can you guess which version shoppers chose to view the product color options?

Select a test to reveal the winner:

Test A: color section modalTest B: color selection overlay

Topics: Design Solutions

Test Your Optimization IQ: App Category Navigation

Test Your Optimization IQ

We surveyed app shoppers to understand how they preferred to navigate product categories:

  • Test A: category links (i.e., selecting a category redirects shoppers to a new subcategory page)
  • Test B: category accordions (i.e., selecting a category expands its subcategory pages)

Can you guess which version shoppers thought was the easiest to find what they were looking for?

Select a test to reveal the winner:

Test A: category linksTest B: category accordions

Topics: Design Solutions Apps

Test Your Optimization IQ: Displaying App Categories

Test Your Optimization IQ

We surveyed app shoppers and showed them an app homepage displaying shopping categories:

  • Test A: app category list
  • Test B: app category thumbnails
  • Test C: app category banners

Can you guess which version shoppers thought was the easiest to find what they were looking for?

Select a test to reveal the winner:

Test A: ListTest B: ThumbnailsTest C: Banners

Topics: Design Solutions Apps

Brander Spotlight on Accessible Web Design

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Making the web accessible for everyone may seem like a daunting task if you're doing it on your own, especially when large corporations experience million-dollar lawsuits due to non-compliance.

Branding Brand Art Director Ashley Golen discussed how we're helping retailers deliver the best online experiences.

Q: Why is accessible web design important?
A: The internet is for everyone. Everyone has a right to access the same information regardless of mental or physical limitations. When websites don’t meet accessibility standards, we are limiting access to information for those with disabilities.

Q: What does it mean to be “web accessible”?
A: To be web accessible, a website needs to adhere to WCAG 2.0 (Web Content Accessibility  Guidelines). WCAG is a set of guidelines developed by the W3C to establish a standard for accessible content on the web. By 2018, all websites should adhere to the lowest level of WCAG compliance or else they risk prosecution.

Q: What is your team doing to help retailers become web accessible?
A: The Creative Team at Branding Brand is incorporating these standards into our standard workflow with the goal of making our work accessible to all:

  • We are now designing to meet contrast and color requirements, so that those with low vision or color blindness are not limited in their interactions on our sites.
  • We are designing deliberate focus states so that users who navigate the web via keyboard can still navigate on our sites.
  • Our error states are being redesigned to explicitly identify errors using indicators other than color alone and context for how to fix the error.
  • Our layouts are optimized so that screen readers can dictate content to the user in a logical order.
  • These changes may seem small, but when paired with the efforts from our development team, they create an experience that is consistent for every user.

Q: How will accessible web design affect retailer sites?
A: If a retailer is building a site that does not comply with accessibility standards, they are effectively ignoring a group of potential customers and missing out on revenue.

There is also a legal component to this issue. If retailers ignore accessibility requirements, they open themselves up to the possibility of lawsuits and prosecution from the U.S. Department of Justice.

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?
A: Designing for accessibility means designing for empathy. It’s looking outside of the “perfect” user story and designing for the flawed. When we design for these human cases, we are moving closer to the idea of "one web," where information is accessible to all no matter the user’s personal narrative. I think that’s an idea everyone can rally behind.

Take a look at our research on the Fundamentals of Accessible Web Design, or contact one our usability experts to discuss how your digital experiences can be more accessible.

Contact us

Topics: Design Trends Solutions Company